Terra Nullius by Claire Coleman

It’s time to rid our nation of the myth of the ‘nomadic Aborigines’ and the tangle of falsities this core belief creates. It’s time to understand that in 1788 a nomadic people arrived in Australia and took land from a settled people and used it to continue their nomadic ways. When the notion that my people were nomadic is corrected it will make the belief in terra nullius, a doctrine that was overturned but is still entrenched in the minds of many, untenable. Once Australia as a nation corrects its thinking on this issue, one of many myths that drive the nation, it might finally learn to respect the people who belong to this land. Continue reading Terra Nullius by Claire Coleman

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Is it possible that everything that can be done is being done to numb you to the essential and infinitely subtle suffering and joy of being alive?

Is it possible that poetry wants to awaken your awareness of the essential and infinitely subtle suffering and joy of being alive?

Is it possible that poetry can awaken you without telling you exactly how?

Why shouldn’t a poem create a space for the language of difficulty? Continue reading Read this week

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Writing that confuses—writing that troubles the idea of truth is not really allowed to be nonfiction in the end, right? Because, look, the genre says “NON” and then it says “FICTION.” But writing that confuses illustrates a lived experience of conflict and dissonance, of winking, of knowing how good it feels to be winked at, of being at once invisible and hyper visible, of struggling toward multiple forms of fluency. Continue reading Read this week

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To understand how we got to this point, we need to scratch away at our collective psychology. Put a mirror up to the horrors we harbour and continue to perpetuate. When I fast forward through ethnic cleansing, internal displacement, the White Australia Policy, and the continuous discomfort we have when someone dares articulate these tensions, I realise that we still harbour a darkness—one that without continued resistance, will always rear its ugly head. Continue reading Read this week

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Art, too, is a system. It is a network of interdependent relationships: firstly of the artists with themselves and the world in which they live, and then with the artwork they create; next, with those who encounter the art and who then create relationships between the art, the world and themselves. Art is made and received in a dynamic structure of exchange in which order and disorder are in constant tension and flux. Its potential excess of sensory and emotional stimuli makes art particularly subject – just as the body is – to forces of control. Art both expresses modes of control and exceeds them, and art always, for better or worse, overflows its intentions. Continue reading Read this week

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Everywhere one turns or cares to look, the signs of a collapsing world are evident; at the centre, at its extremities, the systems of western power are fragmenting. Thus the British empire at the beginning of the twentieth century, the German empire in the middle years of this century, and the American empire today are simultaneously forewarnings, witnesses and the history of this dissolution; and the development of each testified to the characteristic tendency of capitalist societies to amass violence for domination and exploitation and a diminishing return, a dialectic, in its use. “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold…” Continue reading Read this week